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Best Comedy Movies on Netflix Right Now (January 2019)

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Best Comedy Movies on Netflix Right Now (January 2019)


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Check out our monthly update on the best new releases.

Are you looking for the best comedy movies on Netflix right now? Everybody needs to laugh, but sometimes your options are limited. While a service like Netflix seems to be flooded with comedy movies, it’s not always clear what comedies are funny and what will flat-out ruin your evening. And that’s where we come in with our monthly updates on the best new movies on Netflix.

What is you quest? Is it to seek the grail? To find a hidden family fortune? To find a rug that really ties your place together? Well then great, because there are a bunch of good comedies to choose from on Netflix…

We’ve scoured the vast expanse of the service and come back with our picks for the best comedy movies on Netflix right now, including many of the top recent comedies from 2018, 2017, 2016 and 2015, as well as many of the all-time greatest classics. Some of these movies are silly, some of these movies are dark. Some of them are fun for the whole family, some make more sense for a drunken evening hanging out with your pals. No matter the case, these new releases in comedies that are on Netflix right now prove that the genre is a big and broad one and there’s something for everyone! So read on for the hottest and funniest new comedy movies on Netflix!

Oh, and when you’re done here, be sure to also check out our list of the 25 Best Comedies Ever and what’s new to Netflix this month.

Or follow these links for the best of other genres:

The best sci-fi movies on Netflix

The best horror movies on Netflix

The best drama movies on Netflix

The best action movies on Netflix

The best horror TV shows on Netflix

The best anime series on Netflix

Please note: This list pertains to U.S. Netflix subscribers. Some titles may not currently be available on international platforms.

Best Comedy Movies on Netflix Right Now

Monty Python and the Holy Grail

One of the silliest, funniest, and most inspired comedies ever made. The British sketch comedy troupe Monty Python took aim at the history of Britain and its most beloved cultural icon, chopped all the limbs off, and made more than a few pointed remarks about just how ridiculous humanity was in the past (and, by extension, just how ridiculous it still is). Graham Chapman stars as Arthur, tasked with locating the Holy Grail, a quest that sends him and his idiot knights on one absurd and unforgettable mission after another, to accomplish tasks like buying shrubberies, ruining arranged weddings and not having sex.

The Addams Family

The Addams Family

The beloved comic strip and television series came back, bigger and arguably even better than ever, in Barry Sonnenfeld’s comedy classic The Addams Family. Raul Julia and Anjelica Huston star as Gomez and Morticia Addams, a married couple desperately in love and living out the perfect life of macabre familial bliss, with regular trips to torture chambers, kids who are constantly and literally trying to murder each other, and a disembodied hand who gives great scalp massages. Perfect cast, perfectly morbid, utterly delightful.

The Big Lebowski

The Big Lebowski

An intensely laidback stoner bowling enthusiast gets wrapped up in an absurdly complicated mystery in The Big Lebowski, which may very well be the funniest film The Coen Brothers have ever made. Jeff Bridges plays The Dude, who shambles his way through a story that would have given Philip Marlowe a headache, and his best friend Walter, played by the incredible John Goodman, is there every step of the way… to completely screw everything up.

Friday

Friday

Years before he directed Straight Outta Compton, the blockbuster drama about N.W.A., filmmaker F. Gary Gray made his feature directorial debut with Friday, which starred and was co-written by Ice Cube himself. This freewheeling comedy classic tells the story of Craig (Ice Cube) and his best friend Smokey (Chris Tucker), who spend their lazy Friday getting into misadventures throughout the neighborhood, and running afoul of local bully Deebo (Tiny Lister, Jr.).

Shaun of the Dead

Shaun of the Dead Zombies

The zombie apocalypse is here, and it’s just what shiftless layabout Shaun (Simon Pegg) needed to get his life in order. With hordes of undead roaming the streets, Shaun sets about confronting his overbearing roommate, visiting his neglected mother, making peace with his stepfather, healing his broken relationship with his girlfriend and growing out of his infantile relationship with his best friend, Ed (Nick Frost). And all the while, there’s gore, gags, and tons of stealthy references to other classic horror movies. Shaun of the Dead is a classic zombie movie, but it’s also a classic movie about growing up (and it’s also one of the funniest films ever made).

The Lobster

The Lobster

This bizarre comedy from director Yorgos Lanthimos (The Favourite) stars Colin Farrell as a man who has to find a lifelong mate in 45 days… or he’ll be transformed into a lobster. It’s not even a unique problem: Everyone in this world has to find a romantic partner or risk being shuffled aside in The Lobster, which is a pretty damning take on a culture that enforces and judges based on unrealistic expectations for our social behavior and lifestyles. The whole movie plays like a Monty Python routine that got way out of hand, and that’s the whole point, showing just how absurd our values are once we take them to extremes.

Julie and Julia

Julie and Julia

The last film directed by comedy legend Nora Ephron is one of her very best, a light and inspirational story of two women connected by food and not much else. Amy Adams stars as Julie Powell, a young woman who turns her quest to prepare every recipe in Julia Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking into a phenomenon, and Meryl Streep as Child, who overcame impressive obstacles on her path to becoming a world famous chef. Both the lead performances are wonderful, in a film that will inspire you to try harder and cook your own meals more often.

Black Dynamite

Black Dynamite

Michael Jai White stars in an affectionate and uproarious spoof of blaxploitation classics, as a hero avenging the death of his brother, cleaning up the streets of his city. But Black Dynamite doesn’t stop there. The film travels all the way to Kung Fu Island and The White House, as the title hero saves the world from the insidious conspiracies of The Man, and looks danged good while doing it. Whether you love the blaxploitation genre or have never seen it before, Black Dynamite’s unapologetic, over the top heroism and period-specific detail will make you laugh out loud.

Blazing Saddles

Blazing Saddles

Mel Brooks’s Blazing Saddles was considered offensive when it came out, and it’s downright shocking today. But it’s still one of the funniest movies ever. Cleavon Little plays the first black sheriff in the wild west, taking care of a whole town full of racists who’d rather kill him than owe him their lives. Gene Wilder co-stars as an alcoholic gunslinger, and yes, there is definitely a candygram for Mongo.

The Emperor’s New Groove

The Emperor's New Groove

One of Disney’s most disastrous production cycles (look it up, it’s crazy) yielded, surprisingly enough, one of the studio’s funniest comedies. David Spade stars as an egomaniacal emperor who gets transformed into a llama, and has to team up with a peasant played by John Goodman, who hates him, to get his kingdom back and grow as a person. The jokes fly faster than any other animated Disney flick, Spade and Goodman are great together, and the extremely weird story ties it all together.

Clerks

Clerks

Kevin Smith’s directorial debut, Clerks, was an eye-opening and mostly honest illustration of a geeky, immature subculture which, in the years that followed, went completely mainstream thanks to the internet. In the stark, black-and-white film two aimless clerks – one who works at a convenience store, the other at the video store next door – spend their days being mistreated by, and mistreating, the denizens of their community. They stave off the constant boredom by whining about their sex lives and searching for deeper meaning in Star Wars, failing to realize that pop culture is no substitute for real-world maturity. Smith’s profane and offensive dialogue is fitting, and sharp, and throughout the film’s many ironic vignettes he never lets these jerks completely off the hook, no matter how sympathetic they may (or may not) be.

Stripes

Stripes

Bill Murray and Harold Ramis can’t get anywhere in proper society, so they decide to join the Army, where their problems will be the government’s problems for a change. Naturally they get into all kinds of trouble, giving the institution a proper goosing and eventually stealing a prototype winnebago war tank and going for a joyride in Europe. Stripes is sloppy in the story department, but it’s all just an excuse to let Murray, Ramis, and their co-stars P.J. Soles, Sean Young, John Larroquette and John Candy loose, and when they go wild it’s almost impossible not to laugh out loud.

Happy Gilmore

Happy Gilmore

Adam Sandler’s earliest comedies were angry, ridiculous, and they understood that Sandler himself was immature and needed to grow up. In Happy Gilmore, Sandler stars as a hockey player who winds up in the world of professional golf, where his angry outbursts are completely inappropriate but his wicked sticking makes him a superstar. The surreal image of him fighting and getting his butt kicked by aging gameshow host Bob Barker remains one of the funniest moments in Sandler’s decades-long repertoire.

Sleeping With Other People

Sleeping With Other People

Leslye Headland’s overlooked but brilliantly written romantic comedy Sleeping With Other People stars Jason Sudeikis and Alison Brie as people who decide that their sex drive has gotten them into trouble and decide to be platonic friends, even though they really, really, really want to get into bed together. Sudeikis and Brie have incredible chemistry, and the film’s sparkling dialogue is priceless.

Burn After Reading

Burn After Reading

The Coen Brothers are  famous for their Oscar-winning crime films (Fargo, No Country for Old Men) and their iconic comedies (The Big Lebowski, Raising Arizona), but most of their lesser known films are very good too. Case in point: Burn After Reading, an acidic spy spoof about a pair of fitness trainers who stumble across what they think are top secret documents, and who set in motion a sequence of events that leads to murders and ruination. It’s a merciless satire of naive ambition, unexpected and surprisingly dark, and Brad Pitt gives what is probably his funniest performance.

Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie

Captain Underpants

A pair of kids discover, quite unexpectedly, that they have the power to hypnotize their mean principal, so they transform him into a superhero in this exceptionally eccentric animated movie. Captain Underpants was overlooked when it came out in 2017, but the film has a creative streak a mile wide, and an earnest and believable friendship at the core of these wild shenanigans. It’s probably the closest we will ever come to getting a Calvin & Hobbes movie.

Frances Ha

Frances Ha

Lady Bird writer/director Greta Gerwig co-wrote and stars in Frances Ha, a bittersweet comedy about a young woman gradually coming to terms with the possibility that she won’t achieve her big dreams of becoming a professional dancer, and might need to do something else with her life. It’s a difficult lesson to contemplate, let alone learn the hard way, and yet – as directed by Noah Baumbach – the film never loses its sense of humor, no matter how self-deprecating it becomes.

Goon and Goon: Last of the Enforcers

Goon Last of the Enforcers

Goon is one of the best sports comedies in years, and surprisingly enough so is the sequel. Seann William Scott stars as a hockey player who can’t skate, and can’t score goals, but can take and dish out a punch better than anyone in the league. When he’s not brawling inside the ring, he’s figuring out his place in a world where getting hit in the face isn’t considered a valuable skill. Everyone in the cast is a delight, but Seann William Scott in particular has never been better.

Heathers

Heathers

It’s hard to imagine a comedy as dark as Heathers getting made today, at least without being labeled as a horror movie. Winona Ryder stars as a teenager who falls in with a charismatic rebel, played by Christian Slater, and together they kill the most popular girls in school and trick the community into thinking it’s a rash of suicides. The humor is so biting you might need a disinfectant, but it’s so danged daring – even to this day – that it stands out as one of the best teen comedies ever made.

Hot Fuzz

Hot Fuzz

Simon Pegg plays a by-the-book city cop who moves to a small town and finds more danger than he could ever have expected. Edgar Wright’s comedy is to cop movies what Shaun of the Dead was to zombie movies, a merciless riff on every cliché in the book, and an inspiring, heartwarming buddy comedy to boot. Pegg and Nick Frost are golden together, and the bravura action-packed finale is one for the books.

I Love You, Man

I Love You Man

Paul Rudd is getting married, but he doesn’t have a best man. In fact, he doesn’t have any male friends at all. So his wife encourages him to find bromance before they get married, resulting in a witty and charming romantic comedy in which the protagonists just happen to be dudes in a platonic relationship. They have a meet cute, they go out on man dates, and yes, it all leads to a comedic misunderstanding and an interrupted wedding. It hits all the familiar beats but it always feels novel, even a little subversive, and Paul Rudd and Jason Segel are great as the dual leads.

Trading Places

Trading Places

Dan Aykroyd plays a stuck-up investor and Eddie Murphy plays a poor, but wily con artist. They trade places, as the title suggests, as the result of a sinister wager that teaches everyone a valuable lesson, but more importantly than that leads to one great gag after another. Aykroyd and Murphy have rarely been better, and that’s really saying something in a comedy that may be 35 years old, but is still as funny as ever.

The Truman Show

The Truman Show

You would think that a film about Jim Carrey being trapped in a reality TV show, completely unaware that he’s being filmed, would be a laugh-a-minute farce on par with Dumb and Dumber or The Mask. But in The Truman Show, the laughs have a disturbing undercurrent. Directed by Peter Weir (Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World), The Truman Show is a dark satire about social trappings, media influence and unfulfilled dreams. Carrey gives what may be his best performance, and Andrew Niccol’s Oscar-nominated screenplay is one of the smartest sci-fi scripts on record.

Wet Hot American Summer

Wet Hot American Summer

The cult comedy nobody cared about, which became a cult hit, which became a popular Netflix comedy series. Wet Hot American Summer has been on quite a journey, but the original is still (arguably) the best. A bunch of high school kids (played by 30-something adults) have one day left at summer camp, and embark on some of the craziest adventures imaginable. The humor is absurdist and unpredictable, the cast is funny as hell, and if you have any affection for the summer camp movie genre, the satire is incredibly spot-on.

So there you have it: what to watch on Netflix right now in the world of comedy movies. Check back here each month for new titles as Netflix adds them!

Note: This article is frequently amended to remove films no longer on Netflix, and to include more comedy films that are now available on the service.

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